16 March 1928

It happened very slowly when parts of the old church in Højerup crashed into the sea. Read more.

The cultural landscape

The cliff is characterised by the east-facing military facility, which closed off the majority of the coast to the civilian population during The Cold War. The long, steep stretch of coast that makes up Stevns Klint has set the agenda for much of the life that has been lived at Stevns.

At the face of it, it has not been attractive to establish villages by the edge of the cliff without access to the sea. At any rate, it is evident that the oldest villages at the outermost part of Stevns are located some distance behind the cliff.

The landscape has also had an impact on the place names along Stevns Klint. The names of the many inlets and headlands in particular reflect the landscape. The sea is constantly gnawing into the cliff's soft chalk, and as a result, cliff slides are frequent. This has provided inspiration for a legend about the old church in Højerup. The cliff itself has lent its name to many legends about Klintekongen (the King of the Cliff) who lives in Stevns Klint when he is not riding through the countryside around Stevns to frighten off other men of power.

The low coast with its sandy beach has formed the basis for extensive construction of holiday homes. The cliff is also characterised by the large east-facing military facility, which closed off the majority of the coast to the civilian population during The Cold War.