UNESCO World Heritage!

The dinosaurs and half of all species became extinct when an asteroid hit Earth 66 million years ago. Traces of the asteroid are found in the Fish Clay that is visible as a thin black/gray layer in Højerup. Stevns Klint is the best place in the world to study the clay and is UNESCO World Heritage.

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Visit Stevns Klint

You can walk along Stevns Klint, which is UNESCO World Heritage and offers many experiences. Follow the approx. 20 km footpath, which stretches from Bøgeskov in the north to Rødvig in the south.
 

UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE 

Visit Stevns Klint Højerup and find out why Stevns Klint is inscribed on UNESCO's prestigious list of the world's most unique cultural and natural heritage. Photo: Jakob Lautrup / GEUS

 

THE COLD WAR

During The Cold War, the peninsula of Stevns would have been on the absolute frontline if war had broken out between the East and the West. Experience traces from The Cold War at Stevnsfort Cold War Museum, by Stevns Lighthouse and by Stevns Nature Centre at Mandehoved. Photo: Kalklandet

 

WHEN STEVNS WAS COVERED BY THE SEA

At Holtug Chalk Quarry, you can find fossils of animals that lived in the sea that covered Stevns and most of Northern Europe more than 65.5 million years ago. Illustration: Sune Elskær and Tor Fruergaard

 

LIMESTONE AS A LIVELIHOOD

For centuries, Stevns' residents have extracted limestone, chalk and flint from Stevns Klint. You can visit the abandoned limestone and chalk quarries in Boesdal and Holtug, and in several other places along the cliff you can see where workers have cut out building stones from the cliff. Photo: Kalklandet

 

BEAUTIFUL AND RARE NATURE

The nature of the Limestone Landscape along Stevns Klint is unique. It forms a breeding ground for rare and endangered species and is popular among birdwatchers. Every spring and autumn, millions of birds migrate via Stevns Klint. The limy soil has also created oases for rare plants. Mandehoved, Holtug Chalk Quarry and Stevns Lighthouse are particularly worth a visit. Photo: Rudy Hemmingsen